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1952 Schwinn Hornet Marin-ish/Casual-ish style Klunker build

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Is the bike in your possession? Due to the mention of it being a 1952 model and then looking at the stem and bolt on stand, I'm betting that's a 1953. Schwinn repeated some 1952 serial numbers in 1953. The hole spacing for the large oval is 3-1/4 inches. The small ovals and the prewar badges have a spacing of 2-3/16 inches.
 
Is the bike in your possession? Due to the mention of it being a 1952 model and then looking at the stem and bolt on stand, I'm betting that's a 1953. Schwinn repeated some 1952 serial numbers in 1953. The hole spacing for the large oval is 3-1/4 inches. The small ovals and the prewar badges have a spacing of 2-3/16 inches.
No, not in my possession yet. I should be able to pick it up in the next couple weeks. I have to get up to Portland though.
 
Here's Joe Breeze giving the Rolling Relics crew a tour in 2017. Notice on the originals on display ( not sure which one of the original Klunker crowd rode these) truss rods seem to be popular. I like the way your heading with the build. Maybe some future last weekend in July you can make it to San Francisco for the Rolling Relics ride and take it by the Marin Mountain Bike Museum, give it a test run on Repack. ;)
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Is the bike in your possession? Due to the mention of it being a 1952 model and then looking at the stem and bolt on stand, I'm betting that's a 1953. Schwinn repeated some 1952 serial numbers in 1953. The hole spacing for the large oval is 3-1/4 inches. The small ovals and the prewar badges have a spacing of 2-3/16 inches.
Where have I heard this before? There’s my stem!

@sunvalleylaw, welcome to the Cabe. The old bombers and klunkers are cool; enjoy your build!
 
Here's Joe Breeze giving the Rolling Relics crew a tour in 2017. Notice on the originals on display ( not sure which one of the original Klunker crowd rode these) truss rods seem to be popular. I like the way your heading with the build. Maybe some future last weekend in July you can make it to San Francisco for the Rolling Relics ride and take it by the Marin Mountain Bike Museum, give it a test run on Repack. ;)
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That looks like that would be super fun!
 
This is a little OT I suppose, but not really. And it is my thread. And this guy is hilarious and cracks me up. Maybe some of you will agree. He does not intend to be, but is in his dour Dutchman way as he does a restoration on this B66 saddle. I watched it as I wanted to learn how to care for an old dried out Brooks saddle as I just bought one. I got some good ideas if I need them, and he is pretty funny as he is alternately critical of British mechanical design and parts measurements, and grudgingly complementary of the saddle after he is done. All the while being concerned about the decision his ass will make about the saddle. Oh, and THEN he goes for a test ride in his wooden shoes.


I'll go ahead and collect some other Brooks restoration vids I find here too. This guy laces the transition curve between nose of the saddle and rear seat portion to reduce spread.


Another restoration vid. Basically, using leather conditioning wipes, heat to help it soak in, So, I will plan on using a bunch of leather conditioner and saddle treatment/cream with heat.


Will use this toe strap idea if I need to reshape the one I bought.


Another very thorough and more time consuming approach if a saddle has to be completely reshaped.
 
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This is a little OT I suppose, but not really. And it is my thread. And this guy is hilarious and cracks me up. Maybe some of you will agree. He does not intend to be, but is in his dour Dutchman way as he does a restoration on this B66 saddle. I watched it as I wanted to learn how to care for an old dried out Brooks saddle as I just bought one. I got some good ideas if I need them, and he is pretty funny as he is alternately critical of British mechanical design and parts measurements, and grudgingly complementary of the saddle after he is done. All the while being concerned about the decision his ass will make about the saddle. Oh, and THEN he goes for a test ride in his wooden shoes.


I'll go ahead and collect some other Brooks restoration vids I find here too. This guy laces the transition curve between nose of the saddle and rear seat portion to reduce spread.


Another restoration vid. Basically, using leather conditioning wipes, heat to help it soak in, So, I will plan on using a bunch of leather conditioner and saddle treatment/cream with heat.


Will use this toe strap idea if I need to reshape the one I bought.


Another very thorough and more time consuming approach if a saddle has to be completely reshaped.
Thanks for posting those videos. I have a really dried out (Dutch of course) Lepper Primus saddle that I want to revive to use on a 20s motobike frame. Maybe these will get me off dead center on this build. ;)
 
Thanks for posting those videos. I have a really dried out (Dutch of course) Lepper Primus saddle that I want to revive to use on a 20s motobike frame. Maybe these will get me off dead center on this build. ;)
You are welcome. :) I guess it is all part of my journey on this thing, as though I can fiddle with bikes some, I am not that skilled, so I am really learning as I am going. And so maybe some of this info will be helpful to others.
 
In looking at the modern S/A Drum Brake Freewheel rear, I think I may have a problem or have to do some work on this rear I just purchased. Or I may need to save it for another project. Hmm. Maybe there is a work around. I wonder how they did it back in the ay with the older drum brake hubs.



Also, I am going to the Boise Bicycle Project (a bike rebuilding/repair/recycling/parts place) today to scout for some parts, and then have a few more watched on that auction site depending on what I find. Someone there may have some input on the project too. So that will be fun!

 
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