lacing wheels


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zephyrblau

I live for the CABE
Apr 25, 2012
1,533
433
Castro Valley, Ca.
#43
this is something I learned how to do back in the 70s. (yes, I'm older than dirt) I figured with a little hand holding I could get back up to speed, but it appears as though the photo links above are not current. not to worry... Youtube to the rescue :cool:
here's an example. I'm sure there are other / better ones;

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qTb3x5VO69Y

I'd always heard that the road wheels offered by the now departed Wheel Smith (Palo Alto) were built by "robots".
back in the 80s this was pretty scary stuff, but last year I bought a 20 year old set of those wheels & they're still pretty nice !

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oRYEv2NDdzE
 

Harvest Cyclery

Finally riding a big boys bike
Feb 20, 2013
200
113
Richmond, United States
www.HarvestCyclery.com
#44
militarymonark,

It is super cool your learning to build wheels, not a lot of people step up to the plate on a skill like this. I watched all your videos, cool that your helping others learn the art. I noticed a few things while watching you lace up this wheel.

It looks like your not crossing your outbound spokes under the final intersecting spoke. 3 cross should go Over, Over, Under. 4 Cross should go Over, Over, Over, Under. The cross is what really adds stiffness to wheel, very important on coaster brake wheels

Also, not required, but definitely helpful, try to have your inbound spokes on opposing flanges going opposite directions, otherwise your wheel is biased toward drive direction or the opposite of drive direction.

Last thing, try to line up your valve hole to it is not in the middle of two intersecting spokes, this makes it easier to access the valve when inflating you tubes and makes everything much cleaner in general.

Sheldon Brown's key spoke method is the best when it comes to lacing wheels, also a try to match relative spoke tension before worrying about truing, old steel balloner rims are pretty stiff and can be deceptively straight before adding tension on the spokes.

All of these suggestions are just that, suggestions, I have seen plenty of stock wheels that were not laced the way I described and held up just fine over the years, however, I have destroyed ALOT of coaster brake rear wheels and would rather just build something stiff and strong from the get go.

And where the heck did you find that old Park truing stand? That thing looks early, I've never seen one like that and now I am very jealous.

Hope this helps.

-AJ
 
Likes: Pauliemon

GiovanniLiCalsi

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Jun 29, 2012
3,006
742
Alameda, California
#45
The last time that I laced up some wheels was in 1974.
The Fiamme Yellow & Red label wheels are still on my Italian racing bicycle.
I laced up double-butted stainless steel spokes on the Campagnolo hubs.
I was lucky to have two best friends that happened to work in the oldest bicycle shop on the west coast. They both supervised my lacing at the bicycle shop.
The Wilson Cyclery originally sold Harley Davidsons and bicycles in the early 1900's.
The town of Visalia was founded in 1854.
 
Last edited:

MaxGlide

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Aug 7, 2009
843
204
58
Vancouver, Canada
#47
The first spoke inserted is key

The spoke you start with is the key. You usually start at the first spoke hole to the right of the tube stem hole. When done lacing, you want the stem to be in the middle of the spokes where they go straight up, not where they cross over the stem. If the spokes cross over the stem the will be in the way when you need to pump up your tires.
 

Gary Mc

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Jul 5, 2011
2,297
111
Buford GA
#48
The spoke you start with is the key. You usually start at the first spoke hole to the right of the tube stem hole. When done lacing, you want the stem to be in the middle of the spokes where they go straight up, not where they cross over the stem. If the spokes cross over the stem the will be in the way when you need to pump up your tires.
The only thing I can add is start with the first spoke hole to the right of the tube stem hole closest to the side of the rim you are lacing first. I have laced rims where the first hole was on the back side of the rim from the side I was lacing, such as Ghisallo's. In this case you start with the second hole to the right of the tube stem hole. I agree this is the key as well as remembering over, over, under for 3 cross or over, over, over, under for 4 cross pattern lacing.
 

HIGGINSFOREVER

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Nov 23, 2008
3,094
576
78
Cape May N.J. area
#49
Rear hubs are intended to be laced as a hollow shell. The large notch that mfgs. built into the sprockets, although very considerate, was only intended to be used to help aid the replacement of a broken spoke.

Rear hubs on a cruiser are easy peasy as we don't have to worry about "dish", it's the road bikes with multi speed cassettes that get tricky, as the drive-side spokes get laced vertically, or in the same plane as the rim to accommodate space for the cassette.
Are the rear spokes the same length as the front 10 5/8
 

vincev

I'm the Wiz, and nobody beats me!
Nov 2, 2008
11,595
7,379
crown point<indiana
#54
Front is probably different.It depends on the hub diameter.There are only a few factors for determining spoke lengths but they are critical.Each wheel rebuild could be different ,Wheels can use two different spoke sizes on one wheel depending on the hub type. Here is the link I use to determine length. http://www.wheelpro.co.uk/spokecalc/
 

Bike Boy Wa

'Lil Knee Scuffer
Jul 6, 2014
21
0
#55
Wheels

I have built probably a thousand wheels in my years in the bike shops and was trained by one of Eddy Merckx's team mechanics too ...

Wheels are fun once you get the knack. Never cross over the valve channel ...... A spoke driver is an invaluable tool. Oil the nipples. be patient.....
 

Bike Boy Wa

'Lil Knee Scuffer
Jul 6, 2014
21
0
#56
Online spoke calculators ! what a dream .... When I began doing wheels each shop had its own secret bible of spoke lengths written down ..... Then came the Wheelsmith spoke calculation system you could buy ..... Changed everything ....
 

Beau

Look Ma, No Hands!
Jul 31, 2006
52
4
Minnesota
#57
Here is an excellent way to measure and calculate spokes. My friend set this page up.

http://www.kstoerz.com/freespoke/fullcalc

If you don't know what something means Google can help, or I can check back.

The most important things I can add are to lube the nipples and spoke threads before you lace. Some use a locking compound, I don't. I use triFlow and have done 100's of wheels with that.

Be consistent. I do everything in quarter turns. Keeping the flats of the nipples parallel with the rim.

A lot of antique wheels did not have the last cross of the spoke go under. The wheel will be stronger of if cross under the last spoke.

When you first lace the wheel, only thread the spoke nipples on to until the last couple threads are showing. This will give you a base line to start by.

Once you think you have the wheel trued, take it out of the stand, put it horizontal with the axle on the bench or floor and "lightly" press down. You will hear 'PING'. rotate the wheel and do this a bit until it goes away, and do it on both sides. Then true it again.

Don't cross the valve hole. Also, if you want to be real picky, make sure you can see the logo on the hub through the valve hole!
 

Tikibar

Finally riding a big boys bike
Jun 29, 2015
245
241
Evanston, United States
#58
Great information, thank you!

Do we have to make this face while lacing the wheel?

HouseandParts008-1_mouth-open.jpg
 

spoker

Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe
Mar 3, 2011
4,551
1,613
Minneapolis, United States
#60
the key spoke is deterimed how the wheel is drilled,put your key spoke in the hub flange facing you,from the outside in so you have the end of the spoke on the outside of the hub,the little round end of the spoke will be facing out[that is the way the first 9 on one side and 9 on the other side go,find the valve stem hole,look at the spoke holes in the rim,if the hole in the rim that corresponds with your hub flange put the key spoke in that hole,if the hole is the 2nd one from the valve hole put your spoke in there,now look down at the other side of the flange and put a spoke in that flange one hole behind you first spoke,put this spoke in the rim hole just behind your key[starting this way will make the 2 spokes next to the valve hole straight so its ezer to but in air]now cont 3 holes away from your first spoke and in stall the second spoke,do the same for the rest of the spokes on your 1rst side then do the same on the other side,you will now have 18 spokes in,twist the hub clockwies[shake the rim around so the spokes seat]now feed a spke from the inside out,go the opositedirection of the already installed spokes,cross over 2 spokes and under the 3rd spoke and install the spoke in the rim that matches the side your working on,keep repeating till the 3rd and 4th set are in,after you read this go to shelden brown and see his steps,hopfully my basic instructions will help you to under stand his better,once you get the hang of it its ez
 
Likes: Pauliemon

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