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hoofhearted

Saint Lactose The Tolerant
Jan 20, 2010
4,227
Fairborn, Ohio
CHRIS (chitown) ... you are right !!! ... those two forks DO look similar. It's difficult for me to understand if
the Mead truss fork has loose truss-rod bottoms, or if the truss-rod bottoms are attached to a plate like that
1918 H-D. On a Davis ... the Standard-Duty Truss Fork has truss-supports roughly one-eighth-inch thick, and
the truss-rods terminate ON TOP OF THE FORK BLADES ... just above the drop-out crush. On the Davis Heavy-
Duty Truss Fork, the truss-supports are roughly one quarter-inch thick ... and ... the truss-rods terminate at
the top of a triangulated plate .. shared with the bottom of the fork blades.

CHRIS ... with all of the documentation you presented .. it is very difficult for me to believe that Davis continued
to make bicycles .. under many badges .. including H-D .. in preparation for the war AND during the war. But,
Davis apparently did just that. JEEZ-LOO-EEZE ... it must have been a mad-house at that plant during that time.

IN ADDITION ... that Heavy-Duty FORK 1918 H-D pic is attached to the rest of a 1918 RESTORED H-D Bicycle
... the restoration orchestrated by SCOTT McCASKEY. SCOTT reports that he no longer owns the bicycle.

CHRIS ... what i really enjoy about these old bicycles is the labyrinth of information surrounding them. You have a
very, very good source of historical information and i am glad you are sharing it with the readers. This quality of
information would have rarely been shared ten years ago. A person might fone another, asking ... "Say, what is the
thickness of the truss-supports on a Davis heavy-duty fork ?" ... the response might be, "Well ... would'nt YOU like
to know ??!!"

Thank you for sharing .. CHRIS !!!!

............... patric

post scipt for BUD POE ... when i get some decent, close-up pics (from several different points of view) of a Dayton Fork
(truss and non-truss) .. i will post it on this thread.
 

Flat Tire

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Feb 24, 2007
2,053
Blanchester, ohio United States
Would like to thank everyone for reviving this thread and sharing info! I've been lucky to pick up a few Davis bikes lately, one I was having some trouble figuring out the front fork, mostly because of the curved truss rods, but found some pics similar and now think it must be the heavy duty?.......truss supports are 1/4" thick....

rustydavisbike005_zps5c30208e-1.jpg

rustydavisbike003_zpsf7ea3e1c-1.jpg

rustydavisbike002_zpsa457d163-1.jpg
 
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bud poe

I live for the CABE
Aug 18, 2009
1,051
Portland, Or.
More pics,

rustybike002_zpsadb74827-1.jpg

rustydavisbike004_zps9ba90c2c-1.jpg

rustydavisbike001_zpsaaf1d7cd-1.jpg

To make things more convoluted, I've seen those curved truss rods on Pierce motobikes (I have posted here in the past, will link thread) but I suppose someone could've swapped 'em at some point or maybe they were a Davis option...

I also just want to thank patric and chitown and others for sharing all their knowledge and research on the subject. I was thinking the same thing, years ago 99% of us would have been in the dark....

patric, so in your bottom bracket illustration, do we read that as a 1913 frame? I only see one digit for the "year of manufacture" and one for the "model year", are we to ad these together and conclude that it is a 1913 bike? Perhaps I'm misinterpreting your illustrations (which are VERY helpful, by the way)....
 
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hoofhearted

Saint Lactose The Tolerant
Jan 20, 2010
4,227
Fairborn, Ohio
Flat Tire ...those illustrations show a 1917 Model Year .. manufactured in 1916 ... only the final number
of the dat is stamped. TOTALLY LOVE YOUR DAVIS MOTORBIKE with those dual truss-rod tops .. it's
got to be 1915 or earlier ... PLEASE SHOW US SOME PICS OF THE BOTTOM BRACKET ... THE NUMBERS
.... i gots to know ... WOW-WEE-WOW-WOW ... been in this stuff since 1982 ... not a lot that excites me
... nbut thjt DSAFIS YOU HABE REALKY EXCIYTES ME !!! .... Hoky Crap ... cvan't evten type agfter ppeepin'
that bnicycle !!!!!!!!!!!!!

MORE PICRTURES PPLEASE !!!!!!!

.........THJANKS AGFAIN ............... patchcreek
 
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Flat Tire

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Feb 24, 2007
2,053
Blanchester, ohio United States
Patric, first of all those Yunt boys are scary lookin, but theyre prolly hoardin a bunch of Dayton bicycles somewhere....and not for sale:cool:........and I got a feelin you may not realize I'm yer neighbor, at least once a month I drive by a sign that says 'Fairborn'...wherever that is! Think early Dayton bike tags, from some dude in a van at a MLC meet.....by the way I need one back....hohoho.......
Anyway heres the bottom bracket, besides the serial number I only see 1 other stamping, which looks like a big 1 .....it surely couldnt be a 1911????

Davisserialnumber005_zps3b3dfed5-1.jpg

Davisserialnumber003_zps78e4c90c-1.jpg
 
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hoofhearted

Saint Lactose The Tolerant
Jan 20, 2010
4,227
Fairborn, Ohio
Flat Tire ... have bought so many, many badges from folks in vans at Memory Lane Classics ... you can contact me .....

>>> hoofhearted121@yahoo.com <<<

Look ... some Davis rides have been observed without any numbers at all ... some with ONLY the serial numbers ... the earliest
Davis motorbike i have seen is in a motorcycle / bicycle magazine dated April 14, 1914. Don't know what that large "1" is about.
That motorbike was a Dayton.

ATTACHED IS THE DAVIS Motorbike that has the Year of Manufacture "6" and the Model Year "7".

.............. patric
297.jpg


THIS FRAME / FORK ASSEMBLY is my favorite Davis Motorbike ....... the motorbikes that really move me are the ones that
have a real raked-out angle ti the haed=tbue ,,, aw CARP ...,,...... my tpying is strattin' to go haywrie .. nornally i don;t get
all njacked outta shap ... but i peep juts one koool ride and my wohle wrold goze shizz axe. Outta hear for know ,,,,,,,,,,
 
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hoofhearted

Saint Lactose The Tolerant
Jan 20, 2010
4,227
Fairborn, Ohio
ONE O' THESE DAYS ... gonna know how to post a pic so that it shows big on this page ... not the little
postage stamp that has to be leaned on ... then it explodes to the size of something that can be seen.

1917 Davis ... built in '16.jpg
 
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chitown

Cruisin' on my Bluebird
Jun 21, 2010
2,924
Prospect Heights, United States
... it must have been a mad-house at that plant during that time.
Which plant though?

View attachment 67077

I think Lyman Gould's job was in charge of receiving cases of HD sprockets that were forged at the Davis plant, then make sure they were put on last years Mead's frames and shipped off to Milwaukee crated and ready for the jobbers and final assembly.

1_f601b476316d7f8fc0a8fd85df16b84e.jpg


Patric,

Thanks for the thanks. The history is what I too find most fascinating. But I blame you for these thoughts of Mead frames being sold to Harley. That article that you posted on the Dayton Rolled Metal Co was what sent me down this Mead/Davis connection. I keep going back to the forks and the dropouts of the Harley's (teen Sears bikes also) that have patented construction... Mead Patents.

The recent Harley Owners Mag article I believe, mentioned parts were sent from the Davis Plant to be assembled in Milwaukee. I didn't read the article so can't confirm that, but that is what lead me to believe that the forging Dept at Davis was more capable than Mead in producing the familiar HD sprocket. Mead had made the move to import the 1/2" drivetrains from England and no longer had the forging dept it had before 1916. It was becoming and transforming into a modern manufacturing plant with much of the tool and die and forgings being done off site of the main plant.

Chris
 
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ejlwheels

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Sep 7, 2006
666
Minneapolis, United States
which year/model would this be?

Here is one I am working on...
I am guessing it is a model 162 from 1916?
But why the 9 above? Or is it an upside down 6?

IMG_5672_zps33472066-1.jpg

IMG_5675_zps6d2d622a-1.jpg


I think this has the "Dayton" fork with the 1/8" strut.
IMG_5673_zps7515fb54-1.jpg

IMG_5674_zpsf6d3ca56-1.jpg
 
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hoofhearted

Saint Lactose The Tolerant
Jan 20, 2010
4,227
Fairborn, Ohio
HEY TO CHRIS ... all that lit about Davis building bicycles, sewing machines and munitions, AND playing
Beat The Clock, put me into a thought that says, Wow .. whatta Mad-House. Images of workers elbow
to elbow dance in my noggin ... but the dancin' is far from pretty. The number of workers in that plant,
at the time, is enormous. The building, enlarged many times, (as per the articles) must have been a
haven for the "let's get er done, in a quality manner" crowd.

AM NOT SOLD on the possibility of a serious connection between Lewis and Huffman. Sr. Am not sure what
was applicable on the Lewis Fork patent. Was it the three-plate crown ... was it the manner of attaching the
steer tube or, the fork blades ?? The one thing that differs in the Lewis fork and the Davis fork is the manner
of attachment of the front fender.

THE LEWIS FORK APPEARS to have a sleeve, with a metal bottom placed into the lowest part of the steer tube.
The metal bottom has a tiny hole drilled into the center of that bottom. i do not know if the tiny hole was
threaded ... but if guessing is still legal here, my guess is that the hole was threaded. WHA LAH ... a manner
to attach the fender via a retaining-screw, placed into an a preordained hole in the fender, then continuing
occupancy in the little, threaded hole in the lowest part of the steer tube.

EVERY DAVIS FORK that i have seen DOES NOT have this feature. The teens-era Davis fork has an eighth-inch
(about) steel rod inserted into a pair of opposing-holes in the vicinity of the steer tube diameter .. about a half-
inch from the bottom, and well-within the surrounding, three-plate crown. A little, threaded-at-the-bottom hook
was placed over that rod .. its threaded-end hanging below the base of the steer tube .. the fender installed ..
and the whole package buttoned up with the application of a corresponding washer and nut. This design made
the fork less-costly to produce, had weight-savings benefits BUT WAS A BEAR to fool with if all of the other bicycle
parts were present.

WITH THE DAVIS FENDER HANGER, a bicyclist needed to remove the handlebar stem .. insert a three-quarter-
inch dowel rod into the steer tube .. 'til the dowel rod bottomed out on the threaded hook. The removal of the
fender was often a breeze ... but the re-attachment of the fender .. is rarely straightforward .. as the application
of the retaining nut and washer, from below the fender, wants to raise that hook off its perch. NO BIG DEAL ??!

ONCE THE BICYCLIST takes ownership of his/her Davis ride .. one day choosing to remove the front fender .. well ...
let's just say they had better have all the tools necessary to remove the stem and bars AND a dowel rod to shove
down the throat of the fork ... or that fender IS NOT going back on as easily as it came off.

RIGHT NOW, i would really like to use some Fowl Language.

LOOK ... PRESENTLY i AM still hacked from having to remove and replace a Davis front fender ... and have NO
OPINION on what Lyman Gould's job was regarding H-D sprockets .. putting them on last-year's Mead frames,
and shipping them off to Milwaukee. DAMMIT !!

......... patric

post script ... i will be okay.
 

hoofhearted

Saint Lactose The Tolerant
Jan 20, 2010
4,227
Fairborn, Ohio
ejlwheels ... thank you for those really great pics of your Davis YALE Motorbike frame and fork.

AM SAYING YALE ... only if that residual, blue paint is original to the parts. The Dayton was offered
in Black or in Carmine paint. The Yale was offered in a brilliant blue ... same as on your parts.

AT SOME TIME OR ANOTHER .. the Yale was offered in other colors ... not necessarily stated in the
Yale catalogues .. but showing up in a random fashion. The Yale Badge was attached with a "pop-
bottle cap" device ... not screws. Does your frame have a one-half-inch hole placed into the center
of the head-tube ??

IF THAT HOLE IS not present ... and you see screwholes ... the frame was never a Yale. Generally-
speaking, the Dayton and the Yale Shared frame designs ... occasionally the Yale would have Dayton
truss fork (like yours in the pic) ... but sometimes the Yale could have a Davis Truss Fork ... Standard
Duty OR Heavy Duty.

THE THREE-DIGIT NUMBER STAMPING is a mystery to me. And ... if a "9" were stamped where the model
year would be ... well .. i have seen a "6" stamped lightly then a "9" Bogarted right over the "6".

YOUR FRAME has a clear and distinctly-stamped "9". This shows your frame to be a 1919 Model Year.

THAT FRAME / FORK PACKAGE IS VERY STOUT !!!

.......... patric
 

hoofhearted

Saint Lactose The Tolerant
Jan 20, 2010
4,227
Fairborn, Ohio
bud poe ... your Dayton does not have a Model-Year Numerical Stamping. It does have,
however, an extra set of three digits ... don't know what that means. Many Dayton rides
sport that single "D" in the area of the serial numbers. The Dayton Fork did not come as
Heavy-Duty or Standard-Duty ... just Non-Truss (like yours) and Truss (like ejlwheels).

Nice Dayton !!!

...........patric
 

ejlwheels

Wore out three sets of tires already!
Sep 7, 2006
666
Minneapolis, United States
The bike came with a bottle cap Dayton badge and the frame has the hole (although the badge was held on with glue, as the bottle cap flanges have mostly broken off). It was spray painted blue, with a possible gray primer, and beneath all that I have found possible specs of carmine or red oxide primer? At any rate, I am planning to repaint it and build it as a carmine red 1919 Dayton.

1920daytoncatalogpg23_zpsf52da05c-1.jpg
 

redline1968

Riding a '38 Autocycle Deluxe
Oct 16, 2008
5,242
Seattle, United States
,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,..........................,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
 
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